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Food drink Australia fires: Carrots and sweet potatoes dropped from the air to feed starving animals


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Food drink Australia fires: Carrots and sweet potatoes dropped from the air to feed starving animals

The New South Wales Government is dropping thousands of pounds of carrots and sweet potato from helicopters to feed the endangered Brush-tailed Rock-wallabies that are starving as a result of the massive bushfires across Australia. From the NSW Government: (According to Environment Minister Matt Kean,) “Initial fire assessments indicate the habitat of several important Brush-tailed…

Food  drink Australia fires: Carrots and sweet potatoes dropped from the air to feed starving animals

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The New South Wales Government is dropping countless pounds of carrots and sweet potato from helicopters to feed the threatened Brush-tailed Rock-wallabies that are starving as a result of the massive bushfires across Australia. From the NSW Government:.

( According to Environment Minister Matt Kean,) “Initial fire evaluations show the habitat of numerous essential Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby populations was burnt in the current bushfires. The wallabies generally survive the fire itself, but are then left stranded with limited health food as the fire gets the greenery around their rocky habitat.

” The wallabies were already under tension from the continuous drought, making survival challenging for the wallabies without support.”.

In the last week almost 1000 kgs of sweet potato and carrot have actually been sent to 6 different nests in the Capertee and Wolgan valleys; 1000 kilograms across 5 websites in Yengo National forest; almost 100 kgs of food and water in the Kangaroo Valley, with similar drops having actually also taken location in Jenolan, Oxley Wild Rivers and Curracubundi national forests.

Mr Kean said this is the most widespread food drop we have ever done for Brush-tailed Rock-wallabies and will help maintain these nests and permit them to recover.

” At this phase, we expect to continue offering extra food to rock-wallaby populations up until sufficient healthy food resources and water become available again in the landscape, throughout post-fire recovery.”

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image: “Brush-tailed rock-wallabies (Petrogale penicillata)”/ NPWS/DPIE

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