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Archaeology State: Artifact discovered in 1973 might be more than 3K years of ages


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Archaeology State: Artifact discovered in 1973 might be more than 3K years of ages

Dec. 17, 2019 at 12:16 am Updated Dec. 18, 2019 at 8:30 am MONROE, N.C. (AP) — An item found in North Carolina in 1973 may be thousands of years old, according to the state’s office of archaeology. The 7-inch carved artifact found by a Monroe landowner is suspected to be a grooved adz, a…

Archaeology State: Artifact discovered in 1973 might be more than 3K years of ages

Archaeology

MONROE, N.C. (AP)– A product found in North Carolina in 1973 may be thousands of years of ages, according to the state’s office of archaeology.

The 7-inch sculpted artifact found by a Monroe landowner is believed to be a grooved adz, a tool utilized for smoothing or cutting wood, The Charlotte Observer reports. It might have been used to carve bowls, dugout canoes or other things, according to a North Carolina Office of State Archaeology statement.

The product’s age is unclear, but it might have been made at about the time when numerous grooved axes were being made and used, according to the workplace’s 3D model and description of the item. That indicates it most likely dates to the Late Archaic period between 3,000 and 1,000 B.C.

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About 13 miles south of where the artifact was discovered sits the state’s border with South Carolina, where most of the state’s land belonged to the Catawba Nation, a federally recognized indigenous group now based in York County, according to the newspaper. Farther east along the border near Robeson County lies the Lumbee Tribe, a state recognized indigenous tribe.

The newspaper stated the Monroe artifact’s discovery is similar to that of a sculpted stone face discovered in July. That product was discovered by a property owner plowing a field in Newton Grove, according to The News & Observer reports. The owner moved the large sandstone, about 22 inches by 15 inches, to the edge of the field and later on flipped it over to the see the face, stated Mary Beth Fitts, assistant archaeologist at the North Carolina Office of State Archaeology. That’s when the owner called the state archaeology office. State authorities have yet to launch an analysis on that artifact.

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