Archaeology Second Temple Period stone table unearthed near Beit El

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Archaeology

Archaeology The COGAT archaeology unit is in charge of the management, preservation and access to the archaeological websites in the West Bank, and specifically in Israeli-controlled Location C.

Archaeology Second Temple Period stone table unearthed in the site of Khirbet Kefar Mur near Beit El in the West Bank (photo credit: COGAT SPOKESPERSON'S OFFICE)

2nd Temple Period stone table unearthed in the website of Khirbet Kefar Mur near Beit El in the West Bank

( image credit: COGAT REPRESENTATIVE’S WORKPLACE)

A richly decorated stone table going back to the Second Temple period has been discovered in the historical site of Khirbet Kefar Mur near Beit El in the West Bank.

The unusual artifact was discovered in an excavation performed by the Archaeology System of the Coordination of Government Activities in the Territories ( COGAT). It probably came from a wealthy family living in the Jewish settlement that stood on the site in the last centuries of the 1st millennia BCE.

The Archaeology System has been working in Khirbet Kefar Mur for over a decade. As described by the director of the excavation Yevgeni Aharonovich in a paper in a 2016 problem of the journal In the Highland’s Depth, released by the University of Ariel, the website was settled from at least the 8th century BCE up to Byzantine times, with the early Roman duration marking its prime time.

The COGAT archaeology system supervises of the management, conservation and access to the historical sites in the West Bank, and specifically in Israeli-controlled Location C.

In in Khirbet Kefar Mur, the archaeologists have uncovered the remains of property buildings, routine baths, an oil mill and lots of daily objects such as pottery and coins. A massive wall dating back to the Jewish Terrific Revolt in the 1st century CE was likewise found, which appeared to have actually been erected really fast to prepare for the war. Additionally, the remains of a church with a mosaic flooring and a bathhouse from the Byzantine period likewise emerged.

According to the scientists, the stone table represents a rare discovery because just very couple of comparable items have actually been revealed in the region so far.

” I welcome the discovery of this impressive artifact, which includes to the wealth of other findings that we have uncovered at the Khirbet Kefar Mur historical site,” Civil Administration Archaeology Personnel Officer Hanina Hizami commented in a news release. “We will continue to make new discoveries that affirm to the rich history that took place in the Judea and Samaria area hundreds and even countless years earlier.”